1. sun-moon-planet-star:

The Serenity Nebula

    sun-moon-planet-star:

    The Serenity Nebula

    Reblogged from: dandy-phantom
  2. infinity-imagined:

    The Southern Pinwheel Galaxy

    Reblogged from: ileftmyheartinwesteros
  3. )

    thebrainscoop:

    The Brain Scoop - 
    Starstuff and Nanodiamonds

    There are some pretty awesome things that go on at The Field Museum, and I know I overuse that word a lot but there really is no better word to describe Dr. Philipp Heck’s research other than awesome. Outside of NASA, our Museum has conducted some of the best research focusing on the dating of our solar system largely thanks to his team and collaborators. 

    More than thirty years ago it was hypothesized that we could isolate and distill infinitesimally small carbon molecules, tiny diamonds, from their meteoritic matrices - and by doing so today we’ve released the oldest-known particles developed during the formation of our solar system. Carbon is the essence of life; to be able to hold in my hand a vial full of trillions of these nanodiamonds, this small spirit of stardust, in a single moment I was the closest I will ever personally be to our collective origins — and that is one humbling experience.

    Reblogged from: thebrainscoop
  4. thec0sm0naught:

fungi:

All the planets as one

Mmpf

    thec0sm0naught:

    fungi:

    All the planets as one

    Mmpf

    Reblogged from: ileftmyheartinwesteros
  5. theathleticsloth:

    MOTHERFUCKER HERE’S SOME SWIRLY COLORFUL SPACE SHIT FOR YOUR BLOG

    Reblogged from: dandy-phantom
  6. inritum:

reblog and make a wish!this was removed from tumbrl due to “violating one or more of Tumblr’s Community Guidelines”, but since my wish came true the first time, I’m putting it back. :)

    inritum:

    reblog and make a wish!


    this was removed from tumbrl due to “violating one or more of Tumblr’s Community Guidelines”, but since my wish came true the first time, I’m putting it back. :)

    Reblogged from: inritum
  7. 
Astronomers have discovered the largest known structure in the universe, a clump of active galactic cores that stretch 4 billion light-years from end to end. The structure is a light quasar group (LQG), a collection of extremely luminous Galactic Nulcei powered by supermassive central black holes.

    Astronomers have discovered the largest known structure in the universe, a clump of active galactic cores that stretch 4 billion light-years from end to end. The structure is a light quasar group (LQG), a collection of extremely luminous Galactic Nulcei powered by supermassive central black holes.

    Reblogged from: loveyourchaos
  8. thefrogman:

    colchrishadfield:

    With deference to the genius of David Bowie, here’s Space Oddity, recorded on Station. A last glimpse of the World.

    Huge thanks in the making of the video to the talented trio of Emm Gryner, Joe Corcoran and Andrew Tidby, plus Evan Hadfield and all at the CSA.

    Look, if you don’t want to see an astronaut, in space, floating around, with the voice of an angel, singing Space Oddity, you’re probably an orc or something. 

    Reblogged from: witchpieceoftoast
  9. sciencesoup:

Interplanetary Superhighway
For thousands of years, navigators have used the stars to find their way, but in recent years, GPS has all but eliminated the challenge of navigating the Earth’s surface. Today’s navigational problems are in space—and JPL research scientist Martin Lo has conceived an interesting and mathematically viable idea for navigating amongst the planets: an ‘Interplanetary Superhighway.’ Most missions take advantage of the way gravity speeds up a spacecraft as it swings by a planet or moon, but Lo’s idea takes advantage of something else—Lagrange points, which are the points between celestial objects where their gravitational pull is cancelled out. These points leave paths of ‘gravity voids’ through which spacecraft can travel without having to fight the pull of gravity, so just a tiny expenditure of energy would propel the craft, slashing the amount of fuel it needs to move. The Earth-Moon system has five Lagrange points, which connect to similar ones between other planets and moons, creating subtle pathways that link the solar system—imagine a network of virtual tubes, snaking through space like a freeway but constantly shifting as the planets orbit the sun. Even though travelling along these would be slower than more direct routes, and they do not guarantee easy access to every part of the solar system, this potential Interplanetary Superhighway requires minimal energy and therefore minimal fuel—a huge advantage for future unmanned deep-space missions.

    sciencesoup:

    Interplanetary Superhighway

    For thousands of years, navigators have used the stars to find their way, but in recent years, GPS has all but eliminated the challenge of navigating the Earth’s surface. Today’s navigational problems are in space—and JPL research scientist Martin Lo has conceived an interesting and mathematically viable idea for navigating amongst the planets: an ‘Interplanetary Superhighway.’ Most missions take advantage of the way gravity speeds up a spacecraft as it swings by a planet or moon, but Lo’s idea takes advantage of something else—Lagrange points, which are the points between celestial objects where their gravitational pull is cancelled out. These points leave paths of ‘gravity voids’ through which spacecraft can travel without having to fight the pull of gravity, so just a tiny expenditure of energy would propel the craft, slashing the amount of fuel it needs to move. The Earth-Moon system has five Lagrange points, which connect to similar ones between other planets and moons, creating subtle pathways that link the solar system—imagine a network of virtual tubes, snaking through space like a freeway but constantly shifting as the planets orbit the sun. Even though travelling along these would be slower than more direct routes, and they do not guarantee easy access to every part of the solar system, this potential Interplanetary Superhighway requires minimal energy and therefore minimal fuel—a huge advantage for future unmanned deep-space missions.

    Reblogged from: galenisgalen
  10. sirmitchell:

In my opinion, one of the best things humanity has captured on video. Done in 1979 by Voyager 1 as it approached Jupiter. 

    sirmitchell:

    In my opinion, one of the best things humanity has captured on video. Done in 1979 by Voyager 1 as it approached Jupiter. 

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